Monthly Archives: August 2015

Love in the Age of Big Data

The Huffington Post – In a fascinating article, past Fellow Eve Fairbanks delves into the philosophy and relationship of John Gottman and Julie Schwartz Gottman, creators of the Gottman Method, a science based method for building and improving romantic relationships. Using John Gottman’s highly academic research, the couple teach seminars …

New Orleans Door To Door

National Geographic – Past Fellow and photographer Tyrone Turner has taken an innovative approach to photography and storytelling in New Orleans.  He photographed one person in the Lower Ninth Ward and asked who to meet and photograph next, following a trail of recommendations throughout the community. This project is part of National Geographic’s …

Artur Ávila, Brazil’s Shining Math Star

OZY – In her latest piece, past Fellow Shannon Sims profiles Artur Ávila, the first Latin American winner of the the world’s most prestigious mathematics prize, the Fields Medal. Ávila’s milestone is groundbreaking because of the poor state of mathematics education in his home country of Brazil. Yet the story has not received …

The New Great Game

Foreign Affairs – In his latest analysis on the war in Syria, past ICWA Fellow Andrew Tabler reveals how regional powers are steadily claiming spheres of influence in the disintegrating country, redrawing Syria’s map and, in the process, reshaping the balance of power in the Middle East. Click here to read “The New Great Game”.

The Yaoundé 11

When the police arrived, the men sitting out in front of Victoire Bar assumed for a moment that it was an ordinary raid, the kind they’d witnessed countless times. The officers would enter, demand to speak to the owner, inspect the bar’s permits and likely take a bribe before leaving. “They do it a lot in this country,” said Didier, one of the …

Israel’s Internal Demographics Disaster

The National Interest – In a new article, Neri Zilber discusses the shifting demographics of Israel and what they will mean for the country going forward. According to Zilber, these internal changes will be more decisive than international factors. Read the article in full at The National Interest.