Archives: Malia Politzer

About the Author

Based out of the south of Spain, Malia is looking at the primary migration routes via Morocco and the Spanish enclaves in North Africa. She previously worked for Mint, an Indian business and economics news daily paper, where she wrote on a variety of social issues including disability issues, internal migration, gender, social entrepreneurship and development trends. As a fellow at the Village Voice, she wrote primarily about immigration. Malia has won multiple awards for her reporting and published articles in the Wall Street Journal Asia, Far Eastern Economic Review, Foreign Policy Magazine, Reason Magazine, and Migration Policy Institute’s monthly magazine The Source. She has reported from China, the US-Mexico border and South Korea, and speaks fluent Spanish, conversational Mandarin, and intermediate Hindi. Malia holds an M.S. in multimedia and investigative journalism from Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, where she was a Stabile Fellow, and a B.A. in Liberal Arts from Hampshire College.

Malia Politzer Wins National Magazine Award!

ICWA is thrilled to announce that recent Fellow Malia Politzer’s article ‘The 21st Century Gold Rush: How the Refugee Crisis is Changing the World Economy‘ has won both a National Magazine Award and and an award from the Overseas Press Club. Politizer was a ICWA Fellow from 2013-2015 based in Spain and wrote about the primary migration …

The Mosque in the Cathedral

The Economist – Recent Fellow Malia Politzer has written a new piece for the Economist about the the mosque-cathedral of Córdoba. The article explores accusations claiming that the Catholic Church has taken over the mosque-cathedral, rebranding it as a cathedral only, and has obscured its Muslim history. For those who followed Malia’s …

Migration Crisis in Spain: Where are the Xenophobes?

June 2015 Pilar was 24 years old when she and her husband decided to go to France, to work as agricultural laborers on a farm owned by a wealthy Frenchman in 1955. Born in Albuñuelas, a tiny pueblo of 5000 people an hour north of Granada, Pilar knew what it was to live frugally. Both of Pilar’s parents worked as laborers, and Pilar grew up in a two-room …