A. Doak Barnett Newsletters

Fellowship Years: 1947 – 1955

Fellowship Area(s): South East Asia, Taiwan, Japan, Hong Kong, China

Flight to and First Impressions of India

With PT to Delhi, Trivandrum, Bangalore, Madras

Bangkok, Siam and Arrival in China

Shanghai

National Election New Constitution

Siyuan Province; Paotow, Kweisui and Kalgan

Peiping and Municipal Government

Pa Chia Ts’un Village

Student Opinions and Activities- “Chinese Student Movement” Peiping University

Shansi Province; Taiyuan and Taiku

Tiensin-an Industrial City

China’s First National Assembly

Szechuan Province; Local Government Family Chia, Pao Hsiang, Hsien

Sikang Province – China-Tibet Border

Sinkiang Province

Kumbum Lamasery Interview with Panchan Lama

Tingyuaning, Alashan Territory, Ninghsia

Kansu Province; Northwest China

Provinces of Kansu, Sinkiang Chinghai Ninghsia

Organized Labor (Shanghai)

Communist Progress

Hong Kong’s Political Cooperation with Communists

Communist Siege of Peiping

Communist “Administrative Take Over” of Peiping

Communist Domestic Policy

“New Political Consultative Conference” – Plans Communist Party Characteristics…Requirements…Organization

Communist Rise to Power (Resume)

All-China Communist Government

Communist Administration of North China

Chinese Communist Local Government

“Political Consultative Conference”

The Chinese Communist Movement; Nature, Effects and Reactions

Interview with Student Planning to Become a Communist

Communist Propaganda Techniques

Communist Economic Policies and Practices

Chinese Communists: Nationalism and the Soviet Union

Kunming Possible Nationalistic Wartime Capital; Southwest China; Unnan

Unnan Tin

The Nationsalists: Hainan

Taiwan – Chiang’s Stronghold

China’s Universities: Ideological Reform

Five Anti Campaign I: Nationwide Campaign

Five Anti Campaign II: The Campaign in Shanghai

Five Anti Campaign III: Position of Bourgeoisie

Five Anti Campaign IV: National Finance

Five Anti Campaign V: Control Over Private Enterprise

“New Force” I- The Idea

“New Force” II- The People

The Road to Collectivization

Conscript Labor and Public Works

Propaganda Methods

General Background On China

The Evolution of An Anti-Communist Chinese Youth

Five Policies Toward China

Chinese Communist Party – A Period Of Consolidation

Social Osmosis – RefuggesIn Hong Kong

The Metamorphosis Of Private Enterprise In Communist China

Hong Kong And China Trade

HSUEH HSI- Weapon Of Ideological Revolution In China

What Mixture Of Old And New

Japanese Views On China

“Art Of Mass Character”- Motion Pictures In Communist China

Economic Development In Communist China- Finanace And Capital Investment

Economic Development In Communist China- The Progress Of Industrialization

Economic Development In Communist China- Agriculture And The Peasant

Who Is Hong Kong?

Tension Off The Chinese Coast

Formosa: Political Potpourri

The Economy Of Formosa: Progress On A Treadmill

Economic Development In China: (Postscript): Increased Soviet Aid And A Few Unveiled State Secrets

A Contest Of Loyalties: Overseas Chinese In Thailand

Forced Labor In Communist China

China’s “People’s Democratic Dictatorship” : Recent Political Trends In Communist China

Imprisonment Of The Mind

CHOU EN-LAI AT BANDUNG

Asia And Africa In Session

Echoes Of MAO TSE-TUNG In Djakarta

A Choice Of Nationality: Overseas Chinese In Indonesia

Self-rule  And Unrest: Overseas Chinese In Singapore

Notes On Three Growing Forces Among Singapore Chinese: Political Parties, Students And Workers

A Chronology Of Three Months Of Unrest In Singapore

Problems Of Communalism And Communism: Overseas Chinese In Malaya

A Note On China

 

 

About the Author

A noted China scholar, devoted teacher, and a firm believer in the importance of productive Sino-American relations. Following his Fellowship in China, Mr. Barnett served as a public affairs officer at the American Consulate in Hong Kong and then as an associate for the American Universities Field Staff until 1955. He went on to teach and consult at the State Department Foreign Service Institute, Syracuse University, the National Planning Association and the Ford Foundation before becoming a professor of Political Science at Columbia University in 1961. In 1966 he was the principal witness in a Senate Foreign Relations Committee review of China policy, which is credited with influencing Presidents Nixon and Johnson. Mr. Barnett then spent thirteen years as a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institute, after which he became a Professor of Chinese Studies at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. He is the author or editor of more than 20 books, including China’s Far West: Four Decades of Change, 1994.